Maasai Mara Game Reserve

Vast rolling grass plains interspersed with rounded hills, groves of woodlands, dense scrub thickets and the riverine forest of the Mara River which bisects the area. Smaller rivers feed massive fig trees growing along their banks. The word Mara is Maasai for “mottled” - and when flying over the plains of the Mara or observing them from the vantage point of one of the surrounding hills, it becomes evident why this area was so named.

The Mara is the northernmost extension of the Serengeti ecosystem and is a micro-habitat in its own right. The inner reserve of 518sq km (200 sq miles) allows no intrusion of human settlement, while the outer remains basically undeveloped, an area where local Maasai pasture their cattle and co-exist with the game. It is probably the most famous reserve in Kenya. Its breathtaking views became familiar worldwide when the film ‘Out of Africa’ was released, as much of it was filmed in the Mara. It is perhaps the only region left in Kenya where visitors may see the super-abundance of animals that existed a century ago.

The park has the largest concentration of African lions, including the black-maned lion.Birdlife is as plentiful as wildlife at the Masai Mara, which boasts over 400 different birds species. The park experiences a hot and dry climate with a regular rainfall season twice a year. The reserve’s topography is mainly open savannah (grassland) with clusters of acacia trees along the southeastern area of the park. The Mara and Talek rivers grace the rolling plains of the reserve. Myriad seasonal rivers appear during the rainy season but dry out once the rains are gone. Maasai Mara National Reserve does not fall under the jurisdiction of the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS); instead, it is managed by the local county council of Narok district

Maasai Mara Game Reserve